JAGUAR LAND ROVER FINDS THE TEENAGERS WRITING THE CODE FOR A SELF-DRIVING FUTURE.

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  • Fully-autonomous vehicles will require an estimated one billion lines of code – compared to just 145,000 needed to land on the moon in 1969
  • Tomorrow’s engineers are already learning to code at school to prepare for self-driving future and bridge the skills gap
  • Land Rover 4×4 In Schools programme is inspiring future talent to offset global STEM skills shortage
  • Almost five million more people with specialist digital skills needed globally by 2023

Whitley, UK. 16 April 2019: Tomorrow’s engineers are learning to code self-driving vehicles of the future today thanks to the unique Land Rover 4×4 in Schools programme.

Self-driving cars will require an estimated one billion lines of computer code1 – almost 1,000 times more than the 145,000 lines required by NASA to land Apollo 11 on the moon2. To meet the growing need for more coders to deliver these future autonomous and connected vehicles, Jaguar Land Rover is looking to inspire the next generation of software engineers.

The talented teenagers competing in this year’s Land Rover 4×4 In Schools Technology Challenge world finals – a global education enrichment initiative aimed at encouraging young people to take up STEM careers  – were able to write 200 lines of code in just 30 minutes, to successfully navigate a scale model Range Rover Evoque around a 5.7-metre circuit.

As of 2018, there were 23 million software developers worldwide but this population is expected to grow to 27.7 million by 2023†,  with World Economic Forum research suggesting 65% of students today will end up working in jobs that don’t currently exist*.

This year, Jaguar Land Rover will launch a new Digital Skills Apprenticeship programme to attract the brightest computer engineers to help code its next-generation electric, connected and autonomous vehicles and support the factories of the future.

The Land Rover 4×4 in Schools programme has helped the company reach more than four million young people since 2000. This year 110 students from 14 countries qualified for the world finals  held at the University of Warwick, with NewGen Motors team from Greece lifting the trophy following two intensive days of competition.

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